It all started with a golf injury…

I have played golf for most of my life, and decided to really get serious about improving. Unfortunately, striving for the perfect golf swing by hitting tens of thousands of balls led to a bad rotator cuff injury, lower back pain, and many unanswered questions.

Fortunately, I discovered the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) and attended an introductory golf fitness session given in Toronto by Dr. Greg Rose. I was hooked and completed my 3 levels of certification as a golf instructor in less than one year.

Since then, I have been sharing what I learned with golfers almost ten years ago, promoting the benefits of better fitness and healthier swing mechanics for injury prevention, and longevity on the golf course.

While working with hundreds of golfers in Ottawa and Gatineau, and after capturing thousands of swings with 3-D motion capture technology, and come to realize three things:

Golf is a rotary movement with a forward bend of the torso.

Golf is hard because it is a rotary movement with a forward bend of the torso.

We struggle at golf because our brain is way too good at finding ways to compensate for poor setup or incorrect motion patterns.

For the average golfers to improve, they need to work on the three interconnected pillars of:

  • The stance (or static posture) they adopt when they address the ball.

  • The dynamic posture we often struggle to maintain.

  • And the proper sequence in which individual body segments need to fire to strike the ball correctly.

Here are the services that I offer: individualized fitness and functional movement training, as well as swing mechanics coaching programs for golfers of all levels.

These programs focus on the three pillars of improvement, as they are interdependent. A poor stance unavoidably leads to an incorrect sequence, because you cannot maintain the proper dynamic posture during the golf swing.

When you hear the suggestion: -"Keep your head on the ball," remember that it has nothing to do with your head, and everything to do with your day-to-day posture.

I offer GOLF-FIT programs in-person at Loch March Golf & Country Club in Ottawa, Canada; or on-line.

Contact Dan »

you are not bad at golf. your brain is just too darn good at finding ways to compensate for incorrect posture and motion patterns…

-Dan Houle, GOLF-FIT

2018-01-18_21-11-50.jpg

The GOLF-FIT approach

When injuries started to limit his ability to play golf, Dan sought out fitness and health professionals who could help identify the real underlying causes. A conversation with Dr. Greg Rose, co-founder of the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) set Dan on a journey to learn more about fitness, conditioning and the mechanics of the golf swing…

GF-crunch_web.jpg

Would you willingly let someone do this to your spine?

Yet research shows that the swing of an amateur golfer exerts a pressure equivalent to 8 times their body weight on their lumbar spine during the downswing. Lower back pain (LBP) as well as other golf-related injuries result from faulty swing mechanics, often related to underlying fitness limitations. GOLF-FIT offers injury risk assessments that include fitness evaluation and swing mechanics analysis.

gsnh.jpg

The journey to healthier golf

The pain you are experiencing on the golf course should not be viewed just as a sign of aging. It might actually be hinting at more serious health concerns in the future. Healthier golf is a journey, and GOLF-FIT's mission is to accompany you on it.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

A continuously expanding list of questions (and answers) concerning GOLF-FIT functional movement, fitness and heathy swing mechanics program, as well as many other topics.

FAQ »

Partner Profile: Active Nutrition

To accompany golfers on their journey to healthier golf, GOLF-FIT has enlisted the help of Kim Bristow, Registered Holistic Nutritionist and founder of Active Nutrition. Renew your diet and your energy in time for the start of the golf season.

Active Nutrition website »

working on your everyday posture sets you up for more success on the first tee.

— Dan Houle, GOLF-FIT